Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy

Your privacy is important to Law Firm of Daniel J. Reiter, Esq. (or "the Firm"). This privacy policy is intended both to: 1) describe how this website may collect and use information from your Internet enabled device (i.e. your computer, tablet, smartphone or other device — and browsers or apps used to access the Internet), and 2) describe how you may opt out of any such collection and use. Please contact the Firm if you have questions about this privacy policy.

Data collection and cookies. Features or partners of this website may collect data including, but not limited to: the number of visitors to the site, the time spent on the site and pages clicked, the types of devices used to access the site, and the Internet Protocol (IP) addresses of visitors. The Firm uses this information to improve this website and the Firm's marketing efforts. This data is collected by sending cookies (or similar tracking technology) to your device. Information such as your name or email address generally is not collected via these cookies and other tracking technology; if you previously provided such personally identifiable information through this website, however, cookies may be tied to such information. Aggregate cookie and tracking information may be shared with third parties; and this privacy policy does not cover third parties’ use of cookies. You may configure your device to limit or prevent access by cookies, such as to notify you when you receive a cookie, to block all cookies, or to delete existing cookies.

Partners and features that collect information. The Firm's website marketing partners or features that collect data as described above may include, among others, Google Analytics, other analytics programs, and Google AdWords remarketing service. Remarketing involves tracking devices that have visited this website in order to display ads for the Firm's services on other websites. Use these links to learn how Google uses data it collects, to prevent Google Analytics from using data from your device, or to opt out of Google’s interest-based ads.

Information you send to the Firm through this website. Please see this disclaimer, which generally addresses information you intentionally send the Firm using e-mail or any contact form on this website. If you submit your name or contact information, the Firm may use it to send you information about the Firm's services. You may opt out of receiving further information by contacting the Firm or, where applicable, by using an “unsubscribe” option included in communications from the Firm. The Firm will not sell or give your personally identifying information to other parties for their own direct advertising purposes.

Changes to this policy. The Firm may update this policy. If updates are made, the Firm will change the modification date below.

Last modified. April 8, 2022

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Frequently Asked Questions

If I petition to have a guardian appointed in a Mental Hygiene Law Article 81 proceeding, will I have to serve as guardian?

No. Even if you are the “petitioner” – the person who is asking the judge to appoint a guardian – you can ask the judge to appoint someone else. If there are no family or friends willing and able to serve, the judge can appoint a non-profit organization or “independent” professional guardian to serve.

My disabled child is about to turn 18. Am I automatically able to make decisions for them when they turn 18?

No (except for limited exceptions). In New York, parents are the natural guardians of their children until age 18. However, once a child reaches 18, even if they are developmentally or intellectually disabled, a parent cannot automatically make decisions for their adult child. Guardianship is often necessary for developmentally and intellectually disabled adults who do not have capacity to manage their own affairs without assistance.

If I am appointed guardian, can I force my ward to take psychiatric medication?

Although most guardians are authorized to make routine and non-routine medical decisions on behalf of their ward, the administration of psychiatric medication to a person who objects requires special authorization from a judge, even if you were already appointed guardian.

How long does it take to get a guardian appointed and authorized to act in a Mental Hygiene Law Article 81 proceeding?

There is no set time. However, from the time counsel is retained, it usually takes about 2-4 months total for the guardian to begin acting. However, if a guardian is needed immediately, the judge can appoint a “temporary guardian” while everything gets sorted out. This speeds up the process.

What is the difference between a guardian and a conservator?

Generally, none. New York used to use the terms conservator (today’s version of guardian of the property) and committee (today’s version of guardian of the person). Many states still use the term conservator, but the concept is the same.

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What Our Clients Say

“Daniel Reiter is an honest attorney. He handled my brother’s estate with professionalism, diligence, and sensitivity. … I would recommend him highly!”
– Former Client
“Our experience with Daniel was great. … We highly recommend Daniel for anyone needing a strong, competent, and honest attorney.”
– Former Client
“Daniel is extremely thorough, very easy to deal with, he invests time to make sure that the issues are understood and clear.”
– Former Client
“Daniel is a true professional who takes pride in doing good work.”
– Former Client